Lynda Enright

Lynda Enright

Lynda Enright, MS, RD, CLT is certified as a Wellness Coach and LEAP Therapist who partners with women who want to look and feel amazing by helping them lose weight and reduce inflammation which can cause fatigue, bloating, acid reflux, congestion, brain fog or achy joints.

I enjoy cooking, but along with everyone I find fitting it in to the busy schedule of our family can often be a challenge. That is why I am always looking for ways to simplify - to continue to eat well and feed my family well in a way that fits into our lives.

"It costs too much money to eat healthy!" This is commonly what I hear about nutrition and healthy eating.

Yes, it is not hard to spend big bucks when going to the grocery store, but it doesn't have to be that way with a bit of planning. According to the most recent data from the USDA, the cost of feeding a family of four a healthy diet can range from $146 to $289/week. These numbers are based on preparing all meals and snacks at home for 2 adults and 2 school-aged kids.

One of my "happy places" is the Mill City farmer's market in Minneapolis. I love the fresh produce that changes throughout the season, the fresh cut flowers for my table, the frozen wild-caught Alaskan salmon from Wild Run Salmon, the flour from Sunrise Flour Mill, and fresh prepared foods from Spoon River or Chef Shack. The smells, the flavors and the people all make a visit to the market one of my favorite things to do on a summer Saturday morning.

It is 6 p.m., you just got home from work, you have 1 hour to feed your family and get back out the door to a practice/game/recital/meeting and you have no idea what's for dinner.

How long does it take you to eat a meal? 5 minutes, 10, 20? You may have learned that it takes at least 20 minutes for your brain to get the message that you are full. Many of us don't spend enough time eating to wait for that message. In addition to preventing overeating, eating more slowly can have other significant benefits.

I taught a class this morning where a gentleman asked me a question about a pre-Diabetes program that he is involved in. He was wondering my opinion on the eating plan that is being recommended. I won't go into detail on the description, but I told him I didn't agree that what was being promoted was optimal. But he is having good results - weight loss and improved blood lipids. So, why would I disagree with the recommendation?

I was diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) the summer after my freshman year in college. At that time, I was not pursuing education in nutrition and didn't know much about how food impacted my health. I was 18 years old and certainly was not a good example of someone eating a nourishing diet. After testing to rule out a more severe medical condition, the doctor suggested I add a fiber supplement to my diet and manage the symptoms with over the counter medications. Even at that time, I knew this was a vague diagnosis with no attempt at understanding the cause. I felt simply dismissed with no answers.

Do you hear about inflammation from your doctor or in the news, but not exactly sure what it means for your health? Acute inflammation is your body's natural response to an injury (a cut or break) or an infection (a virus or bacteria). This inflammatory response is crucial for your body to heal. Unfortunately, chronic inflammation is inflammation that persists over a longer period of time and plays a role in heart disease, Diabetes, Alzheimer's, some types of cancer and obesity.

Do you feel bloated after every meal or even when you wake up in the morning? Do you constantly go back and forth between constipation and diarrhea? If so, you are not alone. According to data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 63 million people have chronic constipation and more than 15 million people have been diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome. The cause of these symptoms is often overlooked, but rather symptoms are managed with chronic medication use, leading to side effects and additional health challenges.

Weight loss is as simple as eat less and exercise more, right? That is certainly the messages we hear in the media. And it sometimes may seem like an easier solution. But unfortunately, it doesn't always work.

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