How Do You Master New Skills and Acquire Bodies of Knowledge?

Is it possible to master new skills and acquire bodies of knowledge in 15-60 minutes a week? The author has long time subscribed to a model of learning what he wanted to know in bite-sized chunks over time, a few minutes or hours a week for months or sometimes years.

FLY TYINGIt is possible to master new skills and acquire bodies of knowledge in 15-60 minutes a week. I have for a long time subscribed to a model of learning what I want to know in bite-sized chunks over time a few minutes or hours a week for months or sometimes years.

This has enabled me to create a pretty nice arsenal of various skills that many of us would like to have, but never take the time to master or learn. It’s also helped me go very deep through short, focused bursts of study in narrow fields of study.

Most people would just say, "Forget it. I'll never be able to do it" when they consider things that they’d like to learn. And they wouldn't even try. But you can make any complicated skill or the acquisition of a body of knowledge a very possible goal for you to eventually attain.

I’ve always believed that if you do what others won't do, you can do what others can't do.

In business, that has led me to learn and master new skills, over the years, in any number of bodies of knowledge that have benefited me in my career: real estate investment strategies and terminology, how to sell on the phone, the art of leadership, internet marketing lead generation strategies, getting business credit funding, copywriting to sell millions of dollars of stuff with a written letter, etc. As I pursued knowledge in these areas, eventually I turned those study sessions into real applicable skills that have helped me build multiple businesses that make money.

Personally, I’ve also used short time blocks of as little as 15 minutes a week to learn things that interested me that had little to nothing to do with my business interests like how to write better fiction, the art of conversational storytelling, how to control my mind and relieve stress (need to refresh that one regularly!), ways to easily build rapport with strangers, how to throw knives, and so on.

I'm currently learning a couple things in this manner:

• How to recognize human micro-expressions and what they mean the person may be thinking or feeling at the time (video training course and interactive online exercises)

• How to write better fiction (a goal of mine) by following the advice I was given in a writing workshop to copy by HAND word-for-word an entire fiction book of the type I would like to write [an exercise that I spend an hour or so a week at, copying Dean Koontz's book "Watchers" page by laborious page into a legal pad in my chicken scratch hand-writing]. That exercise sure is giving me a great visceral understanding of the structure and cadence of great fiction, the pace of dialogue, and how a solid plot is put together from paragraph to paragraph all the way through.

• My friend and mastermind colleague Joel Bauer's 'Transformative Mechanisms', from his book "How to Persuade People who Don't Want to Be Persuaded", presents ways of using small sleight of hand in fun ways to tie in to an analogy or story you tell to enable you to make a point better in person with someone you're attempting to influence than you could ever do in words alone [example: sticking a needle through an inflated balloon, or guessing which hand someone is holding a marble in their closed fist].

And at any given time in the future, just as for the last 6 or 7 years that I’ve been learning new things like this, you can ask me what I’m currently learning 15 minutes to an hour a week and I’ll tell you. It seems small but it’s not. You may not be able to take a week to master a new skill you’ve always wanted to, like how to twirl a baton, but an hour a week is 52 hours after a year. If you have a full-time job, you also may not have the time freedom to devote to your business that you would like to, but if you take 60 minutes per week to study then you’re doing more than most people, and at the end of the year you’ll have so much better knowledge and, thus, options than you did before.

Whatever elephant you want to eat, business or personal, no matter how ‘big’ it looks to you now, you can eat it the same way high achievers do: one bite at a time. Master new skills and accomplish more than you ever thought possible.

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